The Slocum Affair episodes 1-3

Featuring original presentations staged through the efforts of The Cyborg Players — a somewhat stiff group of actors overcoming their synthetic voices’ limitations to deliver their unique brand of human irony. Continue reading “The Slocum Affair episodes 1-3”

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Antipodes for Anthropoids

Some fifteen years into the Internet’s emergence onto our lives, we are informing and being informed at a rate that was inconceivable prior to our connection to this digital network. As kids growing up in the seventies we fantasized about the all-knowing, all-powerful computer to which we’d just inquire for answers to pretty much everything.

So now we’ve thoroughly inquired of the great machine. Some have tried to engage it sexually, if not just find a date. Others have practiced varieties of digital alchemy whereby cleverly programmed computer code, or portals established for gathering yet more information, has led to untold riches if not merely new strategies for paying the rent. Antipodes for Anthropoids continued here

How You Gonna Act?

No one is about to deny that our way of life, particularly from an economic standpoint is, at best, currently in a sort of holding pattern. At worst, many are in a real hurtbag — foreclosure, lost job — the spigot for money has slowed to a pathetic trickle — the water is murky — no one really knows the size and weight of the dominoes in play. (A little bit of that ancient and current literary genre: doom porn, but can not help.)

And yet, as a nation that has feasted on the planet’s wealth for the past sixty years or so (in addition to the prouder American tradition of actually producing wealth), we have a store of resources, both human and material, that is certainly in our favor. cont’d here

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Hey! Isn’t that numbnuts staring at his reflection again?

--some Greek person 

(The following ideas are largely borrowed from an essay by Marshall McLuhan entitled: The Gadget Lover: Narcissus as Narcosis, appearing as Chapter 4 of his book: Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man (1st Ed. McGraw Hill, NY, 1964; reissued MIT Press, 1994, with introduction by Lewis H. Lapham; reissued by Gingko Press, 2003 ISBN 1-58423-073-8). Likewise, McLuhan interprets the ideas of medical researchers Hans Selye and Adolphe Jonas, Lewis Mumford, and William Blake — He also said the Virgin Mary provided intellectual guidance — and if you can’t borrow from her, who can ya?)

Narcissus comes from the Greek word narcosis, or numbness.

Narcissus did not actually fall in love with himself, contrary to popular interpretation.

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