Dr. Gabor Maté Diagnoses Messed Up Children

As a sort of dovetail to my last post which explored why networks might lead to sickness, but more importantly, for anyone concerned about their communities, families — their children — and the reasons and possible solutions for a society that has dropped the ball in regards to its present and future wellness; this guy, Dr. Gabor Maté, was interviewed by Amy Goodman on Democracy Now. In the interview, Dr. Maté breaks it down — in regards to parenting, substance abuse (pharmaceuticals and others), education, electronic media, and otherwise, in a way that is both…astanding and outstounding (you know what I mean).

Suffice to say, it’s well worth listening to. As the following link is a Realplayer audio file, it should stream just fine, even to those backwater dial-up types (i.e. those not on speed):

Dr. Gabor Maté interviewed on Democracy Now

Networks, Community, and Early Childhood Education

Today’s post borrows more of John Taylor Gatto’s ideas — in particular his summation of the profound difference between networks and community and how recognition of these differences is pretty important in the efforts at bettering our children’s education — or more broadly: in sensibly developing our community’s well-being.

The people who have come to staff schools are often fond of networking. Professional educators readily embrace the positive attributes of networks. Seemingly however, they are often unaware of the sapping of family and community vitality that such mechanization can induce.

Automations and routines can very well squelch human tendency; dehumanize by any other name.

And to the contrary, participation — as fully human — in complex human affairs — is what makes us fully human. Continue reading